People call illusion reality, and refute the real as illusion.


Beliefs Coming True in Geasa

Geasa

Geis is an old Gaelic word that translates roughly to bond or obligation, and as much as people like to claim they have “no strings attached”, we all actually do.

People often get stuck on the notion that they might somehow be cursed, jinxed, or in some way unlucky and unable by their own power to improve things. It’s not an uncommon notion, but it’s usually wrong.

It can feel sometimes as though fate is against you or people are against you. Even in the case of suspected social opposition, it’s more often wrong than not, as most people are not actually very interested in anything you are doing let alone willing to invest much in opposing it.

Maybe that is like Murphy’s Law? It is like Murphy’s Law. In fact, Murphy’s Law is the most basic way of explaining a Geis of any kind. If anything can go wrong it will, but it applies just as legitimately in reverse. What is true is that the potential always moves into the actual. There is no special slant that makes bad things happen more than good. The reason bad things seem to happen more is that people are more willing to accept and believe that bad things will happen. It’s considered more “realistic”.

SEE ALSO:  Bon Religion

It’s realistic to see the bad, but not the potential success? That’s the common prejudice, yes. No matter how deluded it actually is.

Sadly true. I was thinking of all the “be careful” messages against bad things I’ve heard in my life. Very few warnings about wild success. Though in fact, there are more “failures” that come about from a wild success in actualizing ones true beliefs, than a failure to make these true. What people believe will happen happens. They think their beliefs aren’t coming true because their whims aren’t coming true. But whim and fantasy are not any where near the same thing as belief.

Your thoughts are welcome. Be well friends.

Travis Saunders
Dragon Intuitive

~science,mysticism,spirituality~

(Bold, italicized text is input from One World class participants. Thank you!)

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