Did the hippy revolution change anything? We still hear the same old meaningless rhetoric. There are ‘the power of now’ thumpers. They just switched the book.


Making the Most Out of Spiritual Education by Mariana Ashley in Guest Articles

Guest Blog

The spiritual educational experience can be a smooth ride or a slippery slope. Life is full of numerous temptations, unhealthy habits, and terrible maladies. So how does one expand their spirituality in the midst of such world chaos? Education – of course.

Spiritual education helps students maintain life goals, inner callings, and personal sanity in today’s world. But when it comes to expanding and cultivating your knowledge of spirituality, how do you make the most out of your spirituality courses? There is no sense in taking a course if you don’t get anything out of it, but these suggestions will help you utilize your courses and further expand your understanding of spirituality. Here are some tips and suggestions for deriving the most out of your spiritual education courses.

Know Your Professors and Where They Come From

Did you ever have a professor you could never get a grip on? “Where does he come from?” “What does she really know about this topic?” “Are they really an authority on spirituality?” On your first day of class, pull the professor aside and ask those questions on your mind, like where did they get their education, how long have they studied spirituality, and what topics they plan to cover in the course. Knowing who is leading you will make you more comfortable to follow along.

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Find a “Study Buddy”

Spirituality requires reading, but it also requires communication with the world around you. Understanding your place in this world requires human connection. Converse with those around you and meet up outside of class. If possible, form large groups and discuss what you’ve learned thus far. A one-hour class isn’t nearly enough to cover what spirituality has to offer, so join a group outside of your classroom and keep the learning process going.

Embrace Outside Reading

Reading and learning go hand-in-hand. One simply does not exist without the other. In order to appreciate all that you’re learning, you must do the work to continue to broaden your understanding of spirituality. Don’t just stick to the required class readings; go out and explore outside literature. Read reviews online to see which books conjured up the most discussion or received the highest, most positive reviews.

Ask Questions, and When You’re Done, Ask More

Ever have a momentary urge to ask a question, but resisted? Get in line. So many individuals want to ask questions about spirituality but simply bow out. Spirituality would be nonexistent without questions, so to not ask them is rather silly. Each day before and after class, write a list of questions you have about the daily lesson. If you aren’t comfortable asking in front of the whole classroom, bring up the question after class with the professor or during your small-group study sessions.

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Challenge Accepted Theories or Beliefs

If everybody accepted anything and everything they were ever taught, we’d think the world was flat, the Earth was the center of the universe, and the atom was the smallest particle. Whenever you are taught something that you disagree with or aren’t quite sure of, bring it to the teacher’s attention. Discussion and debate have only aided the understanding of spirituality, so when the occasion calls for it, raise your hand and express your doubts.

Utilizing your spiritual education does you and the world around you a great deal of good. These five useful tips will help you navigate and cultivate your spiritual education.

Mariana Ashley
Guest Blogger
Dragon Intuitive
~science,mysticism,spirituality~

Mariana Ashley is a blogger and freelance writer, whose posts offer a college guide and news for prospective students and parents. She welcomes comments via email at mariana.ashley031@gmail.com.

(Bold, italicized text is input from One World class participants. Thank you!)

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